Article Review: Living with Anxiety

Living with Anxiety

 

Anxiety is an issue faced by nearly every client I treat. Seldom will I meet with someone who doesn’t identify any struggles with anxiety at all. Key points were when it stated anxiety can be a lifelong phenomenon, but that’s OK! The author speaks about the role of family and the community in the client’s life as well and how a support system and routine can be helpful. Part of a counselor’s job is to educate clients and then help them develop coping skills to utilize for the anxiety.

The bulk of this article focused on the coping skills themselves:

  • Identifying negative thoughts
  • Learning to only worry about what you can control
  • Normalizing the experience and existence of anxiety
  • Scheduling “worry time” or utilizing a Kuhn’s “worry tree”
  • Practicing mindfulness, meditation, relaxation techniques
  • The butterfly hug *a deep cross arm hug provided to self during deep breathing
  • Walking
  • Teaching clients not to stereotype situations
  • Becoming aware of your negativity and purposely avoiding it
  • Practicing healthy habits: diet, exercise, sleep hygiene, social media, substance abuse
  • Externalizing the problem *”I am anxious.”   -“No, you are Susan, and you have a problem with anxiety”

The author reminded counselors to be up to date on their knowledge of anti-anxiety medications as some clients will choose to use them. It can be part of our role to help with educate, stigma busting, and also helping the client cope with their own comfort with the medicine. It is also important to know if a client is on meds so you, the counselor, can keep an eye on the dosage. No, you are NOT a medical personal nor are you a prescriber, but you should have a general understanding of how they work and can refer them back to their doctor as needed or work with them more on coping skills if symptoms seem to be increasing.

Lastly, remember that the person in front of you is that, a person. Ultimately, what most matters is their presenting problem and how the two of you can develop and utilize a recovery plan to accomplish their goals.

 

Bray, B. (2017) Living with anxiety. Counseling Today, 59(12).

 

Maslow’s Hierachy 

Happy Monday, y’all! 

After having pneumonia for a WEEK and missing much of my work week, I’m back today! Playing catch up on paperwork and calling clients. 

One fun thing I’ve worked on is updating my cork board. 

In my last clinical class, we talked about the need of involving case management in counseling. That the two do not have to be mutually exclusive and a good counselor SHOULD be checking on their client’s basic needs. Well, we referenced Maslow’s Hierachy of Needs and it stuck with me. 

Today for my board, I added this new posting. 

My hope is that it is clean and simple enough that clients can understand it and reach out as needed. I feel like I will probably ended up changing the way I phrase my writing or the way I display it all together, but I loved the idea so I wanted to go ahead and put it into play AND share with you guys. 

What do you think? Do you believe you can truly do counseling with someone about their interpersonal relationships, self esteem, etc if they don’t have food and water at home? 

I pride and market myself as being a holistic counselor. I think it’s good to take a step back and remember to look at the person as a whole. Really look. Ask if needed. What’s going on in their life. How can you help? 
Asking about basic needs and having a resource list ready seems to be a good fix  for this missing link. 
My thoughts for the day. 

Best, Tana